Sustainable Living: Slow Fashion

Often, sustainable living is focused on eating local or seasonal foods, reducing energy consumption and facilitating water conservation. However, a key aspect of developing a sustainable lifestyle is thinking more carefully about the clothes which we choose to wear. The fashion industry can make huge demands on limited natural resources. Slow fashion, on the other hand, is an approach which attempts to counteract this, with a more conscientious attitude to clothing.

There are a number of ways in which those who are keen to live a sustainable lifestyle can adhere to the concept of slow fashion. Although slow fashion does encourage buying less items of clothing, it is also a change in attitude towards fashion purchase. Rather than investing in the latest fads and trends, slow fashion involves investing in classic pieces, which are more likely to be regarded as timeless. This is also something which can be extended to various fashion accessories. Of course, whether you’re investing in diamond rings or a new pair of jeans, slow-fashionistas will also look for items which have been produced from sustainably resourced materials, as well as fairtrade products. This is essential if the fashion industry is to slow down its current production rates, which are often environmentally damaging.

Shopping for clothes in this way can help combat the speedy turnaround of trends, which can often be seen to dominate the fashion industry. While many shoppers may find it tempting to make frequent purchases of less costly items, such pieces of clothing tend to use the same amount of materials and require the same amount of labour to produce. The concept of slow fashion is, in many respects, similar to that of the Slow Food Movement, which has proved to play a crucial role in achieving a sustainable means of living.

TWAC Florida 2013 April 4th – April 9th

TWAC Florida 2013

TWAC Florida 2013

Trans & Womyn’s Action Camp (TWAC)
South Florida
April 3rd-8th, 2013

TWAC is an action camp for folks who identify as female, trans-gender, trans-sexual, gender queer and gender variant. This is an intentional space to share campaign information and direct action skills in a conscientious, supportive, empowering and encouraging environment for voices often marginalized, and then to take collective action together at the end of the camp!

From the Dine’ women defending their native lands against destructive mining, to the eco-feminists defending forests from logging and developing; from the immigrant and trans women defending their lives from the prison industrial complex, to the mothers and midwifes defending their bodies and babies from the patriarchal medical establishment, women and trans folks have always been powerhouses of political action, and TWAC aims to support this in a safe(r) environment.
Some campaigns and subjects that have been discussed as Florida’s possible focus (which YOU can help us shape) include Eco-defense, environmental racism, immigration, the private-prisons/deportation systems, and birth justice.

We are reaching out for more hands, hearts and minds to unite with us for this week-long event helping us organize an amazing, powerful and inclusive gathering! If you or anyone you know has interest in helping with the organizing for TWAC 2013 or would like to propose/host a workshop, presentation, discussion or skills-sharing please contact us at: twac2013@gmail.com
FOR MORE INFO see twac.wordpress.org or facebook.com/twactwac

Please donate the indiegogo site – there is an awesome video there with interviews from so many lovely lake worth folks!

Florida Tree Sit News Coverage

FOR MORE INFO on Scripps and the Briger Tract Forest check out Palm Beach Environmental Coalition

Palm Beach Post Article

Channel 12 Video

Channel 5 Video

Interview With a Tree-Sitter, Protesting Scripps Biotech Center

 

Article from the Broward New Times by  Lisa Rab

Interview With a Tree-Sitter, Protesting Scripps Biotech Center

Rachel Kijewski has spent the last four days camped out 30 feet above ground, in the branches of a cluster of pine trees off I-95 in Palm Beach Gardens.

She and other members of the environmental group Everglades Earth First are protesting a plan to build a Scripps Research Institute biotech center, offices, and houses on 680 acres of vacant land. The group says it wants to preserve one of the last large tracts of forest in the area, and protect threatened species such as wild pine, royal fern, and ground lichens.

The Palm Beach Gardens City Commission approved the Scripps plan last spring, but Kijewski,25, and other activists are willing to go to great lengths to stop the bulldozers. They derailed a similar Scripps proposal in western Palm Beach County five years ago, and Scripps eventually opened a center in Jupiter instead. The Gardens project would be the second phase of the center’s development.

Kijewski and fellow protester Russel McSpadden have been camped out in the trees since Monday. The Juice asked Kijewksi how she’s faring.

What’s it been like up there?
It’s absolutely beautiful gazing into the forest.

Have you slept? Eaten?
Sleeping, eating, pooping — you name it, we’re doing it in the trees. We have hammocks for sleeping, we have a good food supply [fruits, dried goods, canned goods]. We have sort of a tree-sitters port-a-potty in regards to the important daily needs.

Have you gotten any positive response from cars or people passing by?
A good amount of honks, even at night.

Why did you volunteer for this?
I’m absolutely in love with slash pines and this particular type of forest.I enjoy climbing trees. This is one of the most direct ways I can put my skills to use.

How long will you be up there?
Not sure exactly. I’d like to stay up here until we get this forest actually saved. That’s my goal, but we’ll see what happens.

Videos Live from Florida Tree Sit

First ever Florida Tree Sit

First-ever Florida Tree-Sit Erected to Defend Briger Forest Tract from Development

First Ever Florida Tree Sit

First Ever Florida Tree Sit

Everglades Earth First! activists Russ McSpadden and Rachel Kijewski took the issue of endangered species protection to new heights today! They are suspended 30 feet up in the air to protest the plans for development of the “FAU/Scripps Bio-tech City” on the Briger Forest Tract- the last living forest in Palm Beach County.

Law Enforcement with the Florida Department of Transportation and City of Palm Beach Gardens have promised to arrest the tree-sitters if they do not leave the sit. Both Russ and Rachel are holding tight!

A joint statement from the tree-sitters states, “As FAU graduates and Palm Beach County residents we are dismayed at the lack of protection for the Endangered Species on the FAU/Scripps development site. The Scripps “bio-tech city” plan promotes sprawl and will destroy endangered species located on the Briger Forest Tract. We have tried legal means to protect the site, but the developers and politicians have ignored our concerns. If the state and county refuse to protect endangered species then we must take action to preserve the remaining natural beauty of Florida.”

In conjunction with the tree sit, forty protesters converged at the existing FAU/Scripps Florida where Jupiter and FAU campus police briefly detained at least one person.

This will just be the first direct action of many to preserve the Briger Forest and the endangered species that depend on it. Everglades Earth First! activists plan to maintain a presence on the site to ensure no endangered species habitat is destroyed, and no animals are abused in the proposed vivisection labs.

Hoo-ray for Russ and Rachel! Stay tuned for more updates!

DONATE – to help us support the tree-sitters with future bail and legal costs! Donations can be made via Paypal to “lynnejpurvis@gmail.com”

HELP THE TREE-SIT – We will have an on-going vigil to ensure the safety of these brave activists. We can be reached by email or calling 561-249-2071

FOR MORE INFO on Scripps and the Briger Tract Forest check out Palm Beach Environmental Coalition

Palm Beach Post Article

Channel 12 Video

Channel 5 Video


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Photobucket

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Tree Sitters Defend Forest off I-95 in South Florida

FLORIDA FOREST TO BE DESTROYED FOR BIO-TECH CITY

February 14, 2011: Two FAU Alumni go to great heights to defend Endangered Species in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida suspend themselves 30 feet from the ground in the pine trees of the Briger Tract Forest in protest of the FAU/Scripps Bio-tech City plan.

Tree-sitters display banner reading “Defend These Forests”, visible to all Northbound I-95 traffic.

Media Contacts:

  • Tree-sitters on Briger Tract site (561) 324-1033
  • Ana Rodriguez, on site at FAU Campus Protest: (561) 374-3268
  • Maya, on site at FAU Campus Protest:  (413) 695-2249

Florida Tree Sitters

Two “Tree-sitters” on the Briger Tract Forest in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida suspend 30 feet in the air holding a banner reading to all of northbound traffic on Florida Interstate I-95 to highlight their concerns regarding the FAU Scripps Bio-technology.

Law Enforcement with the Florida Department of Transportation and City of Palm Beach Gardens arrived at approximately 9 am to the site located on the northbound side of I-95 just south of the Donald Ross exit.

FDOT and PBG Gardens police have told the FAU Alumni “tree-sitters” to leave the site or risk imminent arrest. The two FAU Alumni remain suspended 30 foot high from pine trees, holding a banner that reads “Defend These Forests”.

The tree-sitters sited on-going concerns about the proposed development which their group, Everglades Earth First, has been voicing at City and County public meetings over the past year.

One tree-sitter commented “As an FAU Graduate and Palm Beach County resident I am dismayed at the lack of protection for the Endangered Species on the FAU Scripps development site.  The Scripps “bio-tech city” plan promotes sprawl and will destroy endangered species located on the Briger Tract Forest.  We have tried legal means to protect the site, but the developers and politicians have ignored our concerns.  If the state and county refuse to protect endangered species then we must take action to preserve the remaining natural beauty of Florida.”

Further comment from the tree-sitters is available through the media contact.  The tree-sitters and their banner are visible from Northbound I-95, at the Donald Ross exit adjacent to proposed “biotech city” of the Scripps Research Institute.

In conjunction with the tree-sit, forty protesters are currently converged at the existing FAU/Scripps Florida building located at 120 Scripps Way on the FAU Honors Campus.  City of Jupiter police and FAU campus police are on site at the protest and have briefly detained at least one person.

“The Scripps Bio-tech City development violates the Palm Beach Gardens Comprehensive Plan.  said Ana Rodriguez on-site at the FAU/Scripps protest.  The government’s approval of Scripps’ Bio-tech city demonstrates that they are unwilling to protect critical habitat for Endangered Species.  We are concerned about the environmental impacts of the development and the hazards of bio-technology.  With bio-technology comes genetic engineering, infectious diseases and animal testing in our backyard.”

Bio-technology has been a controversial science receiving critique from farmers, the scientific community and residents globally.

The group says that the action marks the beginning of a collaborative campaign to stop the clearing of the Briger Forest, on the ground and in the treetops. Earth First! activists plan to maintain a presence on the site to ensure no endangered species habitat is destroyed, and no animals are abused in the proposed vivisection labs.

Florida Tree Sitter

Protests at FAU for Scripps Bio Tech City

Florida Tree Sitters

Protest at FAU to protect Briger Tract Forest

Tree Sitters Florida

Protest for Briger Tract Forest from Scripps Bio Tech City

Florida Tree Sit

The view of the Florida Tree Sitters from I-95

This Saturday Nov. 13th GAY South Florida

Casting Call to all Florida Artists

Casting Call for Innovative Variety Show in Downtown Lake Worth!!!

Casting Call for Innovative Variety Show in Downtown Lake Worth

Casting Call for Innovative Variety Show in Downtown Lake Worth

Casting Call for Innovative Variety Show in

Downtown Lake Worth!!!

We are looking for entertainers and artists of all genres to help create this project but to also showcase their talent. If you are interested please contact me and we can arrange a time for you to perform, or if you have any questions about the project please don’t hesitate to ask.

If you are interested Please contact 561-503-5743

Choreographers

Dancers

Musicians

Writers

Poets & Spoken Word

Multi-media artists

Burlesque Entertainers

Vaudeville

Actors

Drag Queens

Drag Kings

Location:

The Luna Lounge

129 Federal Highway

Lake Worth, FL 33460

561-503-5743

Oil Spill reaches Louisianna Coast- Oil Spill Photos

Oil reaches Louisiana shores

Over one month after the initial explosion and sinking of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig, crude oil continues to flow into the Gulf of Mexico, and oil slicks have slowly reached as far as 12 miles into Louisiana’s marshes. According to Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal, more than 65 miles of Louisiana’s shoreline has now been oiled. BP said it will be at least Wednesday before they will try using heavy mud and cement to plug the leak, a maneuver called a “top kill” that represents their best hope of stopping the oil after several failed attempts. Based on low estimates, at least 6 million gallons of crude have spewed into the Gulf so far – though some scientists have said they believe the spill already surpasses the 11 million-gallon 1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill off Alaska as the worst in U.S. history. (39 photos total)

A dragonfly tries to clean itself as it is stuck to marsh grass covered in oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, in Garden Island Bay on the Gulf Coast of Louisiana near Venice on Tuesday, May 18, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)

A Greenpeace activist steps through oil on a beach along the Gulf of Mexico on May 20, 2010 near Venice, Louisiana. (John Moore/Getty Images) #

A ship’s wake cuts through a pattern of oil near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico Monday, May 17, 2010. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel) #

Oil reaches the marshlands on the northeast pass of the Mississippi Delta May 23, 2010. (REUTERS/Daniel Beltra/Greenpeace) #

A dead Northern Gannet covered in oil lies along Grand Isle Beach in Grand Isle, Louisiana May 21, 2010. A member of Tri-State Bird Rescue and Research tagged the spot of the location of the incident. (REUTERS/Sean Gardner) #

A BP cleanup worker rakes oil from the beach on May 22, 2010 on Elmer’s Island, Louisiana. Authorities closed the popular tourist beach to the public and media wishing to visit the beach must be escorted by a BP official. (John Moore/Getty Images) #

Oil cleanup workers bring in a load of contaminated oil-absorbent booms from the Gulf of Mexico on May 20, 2010 near Venice, Louisiana. (John Moore/Getty Images) #

Bridget Hargrove of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, her four-year-old son Ayden and one-year-old daughter, Emma, wade in baby pools away from the oil contaminated Gulf of Mexico on Grand Isle beach in Grand Isle, Louisiana on May 21, 2010. Grand Isle Mayor David Camardelle said the town has closed its beach effective from noon Friday due to the presence of oil on the beach. (REUTERS/Sean Gardner) #

Specks of oil stick onto the foot of Maggie Grace Hurdle, 8, of Rosedale, Louisiana, as she walks along a beach in Grand Isle, Louisiana May 21, 2010. (REUTERS/Sean Gardner) #

A reddish egret, its legs and tail feathers coated with oil, flies above the water in Grand Isle, Louisiana, May 20, 2010. (U.S. Coast Guard photo/Petty Officer 3rd Class Patrick Kelley) #

Natural gas siphoned from the BP oil leak burns off on the Discover Enterprise on May 21, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico off the Louisiana coast. Ultra-deepwater rigs and other equipment are being assembled at the site, preparing for a procedure called a “top kill” that BP hopes will stop the flow of oil from the well. (John Moore/Getty Images) #

Natural gas from the damaged Deepwater Horizon wellhead is burned off by the drillship Discoverer Enterprise May 16, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast Louisiana. (Patrick Kelley/U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images) #

Collected oil burns on the water in this aerial view seven miles northeast of the Deepwater Horizon site over the Gulf of Mexico, May 18, 2010. (REUTERS/Daniel Beltra/Greenpeace) #

Oil is seen on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico about six miles southeast of Grand Isle, Louisiana May 21, 2010. (REUTERS/Sean Gardner) #

Protective booms surround islands near mouth of the Mississippi River south of Venice, Louisiana from an oil spill Monday, May 17, 2010. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel) #

Oil floats around booms and through marshlands of the Mississippi Delta on May 23, 2010. (REUTERS/Daniel Beltra/Greenpeace) #

Maura Wood, Senior Program Manager of Coastal Louisiana Restoration for the National Wildlife Federation takes a sample of water in a heavily oiled marsh near Pass a Loutre, Louisiana on May 20, 2010. (REUTERS/Lee Celano) #

An oil-stained pelican leaves its nest as oil washes ashore on an island that is home to hundreds of brown pelican nests as well at terns, gulls and roseated spoonbills in Barataria Bay just inside the the coast of Louisiana, Saturday, May 22, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) #

A Plaquemines Parish employee lays oil absorbent boom as pelicans leave their nests on an island in Barataria Bay, Louisiana, Saturday, May 22, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) #

A Louisiana Fish and Wildlife officer unsuccessfully pursues an oil soaked pelican in Barataria Bay, Louisiana on Sunday, May 23, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) #

An oil-soaked pelican takes flight after Louisiana Fish and Wildlife employees tried to corral him on an island in Barataria Bay on Sunday, May 23, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) #

Oil is scooped out of a marsh impacted by the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill in Redfish Bay along the coast of Louisiana, Saturday, May 22, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) #

A sheen of oil sits on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico close to the site of the BP oil spill as a boat uses a containment boom to gather the oil to be burned off approximately 42 miles off the coast of Louisiana May 18, 2010 (REUTERS/Hans Deryk) #

Crews try to clean an island covered in oil on the south part of East Bay May 23, 2010. (REUTERS/Daniel Beltra/Greenpeace) #

A BP cleanup crew removes oil from a beach on May 23, 2010 at Port Fourchon, Louisiana. (John Moore/Getty Images) #

An oil-covered crab crawls past a blob of oil on the beach on May 22, 2010 on Grand Isle, Louisiana. (John Moore/Getty Images) #

A boat travels between marsh and oil-stained boom near the mouth of the Mississippi River south of Venice, Louisiana Wednesday, May 19, 2010. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel) #

Oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill is seen clumped on roseau cane in the Northeast Pass of the Mississippi River on the coast of Louisiana near Venice, Tuesday, May 18, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) #

A ship maneuvers and sprays water near a rig in heavy surface oil in this aerial view over the Gulf of Mexico May 18, 2010, as oil continues to leak from the Deepwater Horizon wellhead. (REUTERS/Daniel Beltra/Greenpeace) #

These Kemp’s Ridley turtles, photographed on May 23rd, 2010, are considered the smallest marine turtles in the world and are being held at the New England Aquarium in Boston, Massachusetts because they cannot be released in the wild, due in part to the Gulf Coast oil spill. (Dina Rudick/Boston Globe) #

The sun rises over an oil-soaked beach on May 23, 2010 on Grand Isle, Louisiana. (John Moore/Getty Images) #

Greenpeace Senior Campaigner Lindsey Allen attempts to save a small crab covered in oil walking along the shore of the breakwater in the mouth of the Mississippi River where it meets the Gulf of Mexico in Louisiana, May 18, 2010. (REUTERS/Sean Gardner/Greenpeace) #

An outboard boat motor breaks up a thick layer of oil as Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal and Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser toured the oil-impacted marsh of Pass a Loutre on Wednesday, May 19, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) #

A shrimp boat is used to collect oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico in the waters of Chandeleur Sound, Louisiana on May 5, 2010. (AP Photo/Eric Gay) #

Volunteers from the Grassroots Mapping project made a trip in a small boat (upper left) to the the Chandeleur Islands near Louisiana’s Misissippi Delta on May 9th, 2010, taking with them a balloon (green tether seen at left) and photo equipment to help document the impact of the oil spill. Public domain photo provided by Jeff Warren and Grassroots Mapping project. #

Dr. Erica Miller, a member of the Louisiana State Wildlife Response Team, cleans a pelican of oil at the Clean Gulf Associates Mobile Wildlife Rehabilitation Station on Ft. Jackson in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, May 15, 2010. (REUTERS/U.S. Navy/Justin Stumberg) #

A helicopter flies over surface oil in this aerial view over the Gulf of Mexico, May 18, 2010. (REUTERS/Daniel Beltra/Greenpeace) #

A young heron sits dying amidst oil splattering underneath mangrove on an island impacted by oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in Barataria Bay, along the the coast of Louisiana on Sunday, May 23, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) #

Boat captain Preston Morris shows the oil on his hands while collecting surface samples from the marsh of Pass a Loutre, Louisiana on Wednesday, May 19, 2010. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert) #